All posts filed under: Reflect

On life, events external and internal

When I’ll be happy.

I’ll be happy when… I’ve lost the weight I can wear a crop top I have the flexibility of my 13-year old ballerina self I can do a straddle split I can do a standing split I can hold a handstand in the middle of the room I can “jump-through” on a yoga mate I find a partner Someone asks me to marry them I get married I buy a house I feel like a REAL academic… …I publish an article …Get accepted to present at a conference …Give a talk at a university I find the perfect eyeshadow pallet I learn how to contour I find an anti-wrinkle night cream that doesn’t cause my face to break out and actually gets rid of fine lines I own the perfect shade of red lipstick that doesn’t dry my lips out AND doesn’t transfer I buy that quippy t-shirt/mug/tote with the trending pop-culture reference I create a curated wardrobe The house is clean I have all of my desired furniture inside my house I have a …

Book 6: Parable of the Sower – Octavia E. Butler

In my last post I said that I hadn’t binge-read a book since Harry Potter 7 came out a decade ago (jeez has it really been 10 years?!), but I only started the binge once I got around half way through the book. This time, I exceeded myself;  I read Parable of the Sower cover to cover in less than 24 hours. I left my family watching TV and went into another room and just stayed there. I’m impressed (with myself 😜) I’m not entirely sure why it’s taken me so long to read another book by Octavia Butler. Kindred sat on my parents’ bookshelf for years before I decided to pick it up and read it, and then I couldn’t put it down. That was also probably over a decade ago. I clearly love this genre, her style of writing. Why have I deprived myself from her other work? This book was phenomenal! I know that I’ve basically said the same thing about every book I’ve reviewed to this point, and that I’m risking sounding hyperbolic and …

On abstinence from alcohol

My journey to 30 has evolved into this very big project of personal goals. But it started with my decision to give up drinking alcohol for a year. How exactly does one who lives in a place like New Orleans, where the drinks flow freely, where you can take it in a ‘go-cup’, where there’s really no need to wait for 5 o’clock, come to the conclusion to completely abstain for an entire year?  Well, it all started with a juice cleanse that left me with an inordinate amount of time to think. Apparently, when I’m food deprived I get even more introspective than I already am. By day 2 of this juice cleanse I was realizing how much more time I had in my day since I didn’t have to think about shopping for meals, preparing meals, eating meals, cleaning meals, and how after awhile I wasn’t even hungry any more. I wondered what kind of time I would have, what kind of mind-shift was possible, if I quit drinking. I wondered if I’d …

Book 4: Selected Poems–Gwendolyn Brooks

I don’t read much poetry. I don’t really read any poetry the way I did in my AP Lit class senior year of high school. It’s unfortunate, because there’s so much great poetry out there. But it’s also not surprising, because poetry can be difficult to read. Gwendolyn Brooks was the first African American to win the Pulitzer Prize, and on the back of this book of collected poetry is this quote: “She is a very good poet, the only superlative I dare use in our time of misusage; compared not to other Negro poets or other women poets but to the best of modern poets, she ranks high.” In reading this collection, I learned two things:  Gwendolyn Brooks has a vocabulary that far exceeds mine. I spent many of these pages looking up words in the dictionary hoping it would help me better understand what she was saying. Sometimes it made all the difference; other times, I finished a poem and still had no clue. Maybe context would’ve helped, a teacher who knows the time period …

The Lost Art of Writing

Remember when we used to write to each other with a pen on a piece of paper? We wrote notes and letters in our everyday communication, we sent cards for every occasion with personalized messages in addition to whatever was pre-printed, and we actually wrote out thank you cards? Everything is electronic now, the art of writing has faded from the practice of just about every age group, save for those older generations that never got swept up in the tech world. For kids, it’s especially tragic, because they don’t even have ability to say, ‘Hey! remember when we used to pass notes on sheets of loose leaf paper that had doodles and some of our notes from whatever class we were supposed to be paying attention in?’ Today it’s all rapid fire text messages from phones not so discreetly hidden underneath their desks, in between their knees, held with one hand, while they pretend not to be looking down in their laps. And the content of those texts are strings of three letter abbreviations, …