Author: like black butterflies

30 Restaurants: Mr. B’s Bistro & Galatoire’s

November and December eating was in the French Quarter, which I rarely do because of how annoying it is to get to with parking and now the Bourbon Street construction. But invitations from other people will get me out of my slump every time. Mr. B’s Bistro Mr. B’s Bistro is known for their barbecued shrimp, so naturally, that’s what I got. I would get it again in a heartbeat!! The sauce was so good that had I been in different company, I’d have sopped it all up with all the bread left on the table and then licked the bowl. But since I was there for a lunch meeting I decided to act like I had some sense. As an appetizer, I got the Gumbo Ya Ya. I enjoyed it, but something about the flavor made it seem like something was missing; nothing I could pinpoint. Thought it was salt. I added it. It wasn’t the salt. *shrug* Maybe it was just a new flavor. For dessert I had:lemon icebox cake (Delicious!) And though …

The Impact of Police Violence is Far Reaching and Long Lasting

Last week I, as many others, looked for every update that could be found about Erica Garner. Horrified at the possibility of police violence claiming yet another victim. Hopeful that she would pull through. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case. At 27, a woman who had to watch her father get choked to death on TV just 3 short years ago–who had to constantly relive that trauma amplified by the media and played on repeat and be subject to the opinion of every fool who wanted to explain why he [Eric] deserved his fate, who had to endure police harassment, community harassment, and online harassment, who had to continue living in a city where her father’s murderer not only got away with it, but kept his job AND got a raise–had a heart attack. Is it any wonder given all that she went through that her body couldn’t continue on? I have so many thoughts that would take too long to organize into anything coherent and succinct, but luckily other people have been able to put …

30 Restaurants: Compère Lapin & Casamentos

In October I hit up a couple more restaurants on my list. Compère Lapin Everyone’s been talking about Compère Lapin and its chef, Nina Compton, and since she’s a WOC, that sealed the deal on my going. I went for lunch with my husband for our anniversary. While I’d been preparing my stomach based on looking at the dinner menu, the lunch menu didn’t disappoint. First of all, the biscuits they serve as their complementary bread…I could’ve just eaten those for the whole meal. Perfectly flakey and buttery and then the additional butter on top was just the icing on the cake. We always order so we can try the most items without killing ourselves or our budget. For an appetizer we got the cold smoked tuna tartar with avocado and crispy bananas and the radicchio & endive salad. As a second I got the curried goat with sweet potato gnocchi and cashes and he got the drum with apples, collard greens, and fennel. The appetizers were tasty, the tuna tartar was good but nothing …

On abstinence from alcohol

My journey to 30 has evolved into this very big project of personal goals. But it started with my decision to give up drinking alcohol for a year. How exactly does one who lives in a place like New Orleans, where the drinks flow freely, where you can take it in a ‘go-cup’, where there’s really no need to wait for 5 o’clock, come to the conclusion to completely abstain for an entire year?  Well, it all started with a juice cleanse that left me with an inordinate amount of time to think. Apparently, when I’m food deprived I get even more introspective than I already am. By day 2 of this juice cleanse I was realizing how much more time I had in my day since I didn’t have to think about shopping for meals, preparing meals, eating meals, cleaning meals, and how after awhile I wasn’t even hungry any more. I wondered what kind of time I would have, what kind of mind-shift was possible, if I quit drinking. I wondered if I’d …

Book 5: Half of a Yellow Sun–Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

It should come as no shock that I know nothing about Nigerian history. We barely learn anything about American history beyond the anglo/christian/hetero/male perspective, so why would I expect to learn anything about the continent of Africa in general, let alone the history of one country in particular. Although Half of a Yellow Sun is fictional, Adichie did considerable historical research, using her family and friends, in addition to other documents, as sources. So for an introduction to the history of a newly independent Nigeria, this book was really interesting. But for the characters that she developed and the tale that she wove into this history, this book was fantastic! Admittedly, it started kind of slow. Not uninteresting, but not gripping either. She had to construct the setting, develop the characters, provide context, let you learn who/what/where/when/why.  All of a sudden though, this book becomes a page-turner. Of the 500 some odd pages I read about 350 of them over the course of a day and a half.  I haven’t sat and binge-read a book …