All posts tagged: words of wisdom

Book 14: The Color Purple–Alice Walker

I’ve seen The Color Purple with Whoopie Goldberg, Danny Glover, and Oprah, no less than ten times. I’ve also seen the (first) broadway version of story and would like to see the more recent (and apparently better) broadway musical. But I’ve never read the book. Surprisingly, I didn’t finish the book and think about how terrible the movie was in comparison like I do with most movie adaptations of books. Maybe it’s because I watched it before I read it (vs. reading and then watching), but I think the movie did the best possible job of covering the vast time span of the novel and staying true to essential scenarios within the novel; there are parts of the movie that were taken from the book almost verbatim. But all that being said, the book was still considerably more interesting. Obviously, a blockbuster film directed by a white man, adapted from a novel that deals very heavily with issues of racism and imperialism, is going to be filtered out to focus on the more palatable storylines …

bell hooks–on love of death

In our culture the worship of death is so intense it stands in the way of love… We will witness the death of others or we will witness our own dying, even if it’s just in that brief instance when life is fading away. Living with lovelessness is not a problem we openly and readily complain about. Yet the reality that we will all die generates tremendous concern, fear, and worry. It may very well be that the worship of death, indicated by the constant spectacles of dying we watch on television screens daily, is one way our culture tries to still that fear, to conquer it, to make us comfortable… Ironically, the worship of death as a strategy for coping with our underlying fear of death’s power does not truly give us solace. It is deeply anxiety producing. The more we watch spectacles of meaningless death, of random violence and cruelty, the more afraid we become in our daily lives. We cannot embrace the stranger with love for we fear the stranger. We believe …

Audre Lorde on Race Consciousness

But we never ever talked about what it meant and felt like to be Black and white, and the effects that had on our being friends. Of course, everybody with any sense deplored racial discrimination, theoretically and without discussion. We could conquer it by ignoring it. … How meager the sustenance was I gained from the four years I spent in high school; yet, how important that sustenance was to my survival. Remembering that time is like watching old pictures of myself in a prison camp picking edible scraps out of the garbage heap, and knowing that without that garbage I might have starved to death. The overwhelming racism of so many of the faculty, including the ones upon whom I had my worst schoolgirl crushes. How little I settled for int he way of human contact, compared to what I was conscious of wanting. It was in high school that I came to believe that I was different from my white classmates, not because I was Black, but because I was me. -Audre Lorde, …

Parable of the Sower, Chapter 10

When apparent stability disintegrates, As it must– God is Change– People tend to give in To fear and depression, To need and greed. When no influence is strong enough To unify people They divide. They struggle, One against one, Group against group, For survival, position, power. They remember old hates and generate new ones, They create chaos and nurture it. They kill and kill and kill, Until they are exhausted and destroyed, Until they are conquered by outside forces, Or until one of them becomes A leader Most will follow, Or a tyrant Most fear. –Parable of the Sower, p. 103, Octavia Butler

Book 6: Parable of the Sower – Octavia E. Butler

In my last post I said that I hadn’t binge-read a book since Harry Potter 7 came out a decade ago (jeez has it really been 10 years?!), but I only started the binge once I got around half way through the book. This time, I exceeded myself;  I read Parable of the Sower cover to cover in less than 24 hours. I left my family watching TV and went into another room and just stayed there. I’m impressed (with myself 😜) I’m not entirely sure why it’s taken me so long to read another book by Octavia Butler. Kindred sat on my parents’ bookshelf for years before I decided to pick it up and read it, and then I couldn’t put it down. That was also probably over a decade ago. I clearly love this genre, her style of writing. Why have I deprived myself from her other work? This book was phenomenal! I know that I’ve basically said the same thing about every book I’ve reviewed to this point, and that I’m risking sounding hyperbolic and …