All posts tagged: black history is American history

Black National Anthem

For whatever reason, yesterday morning I may have spent over an hour watching different youtube versions of the Black National Anthem aka Lift Every Voice and Sing. I guess I was looking for that perfect version: one that wasn’t too fast, that was arranged in parts instead of just singing the basic melody, one that had a good amount of bass in it, and one that played a specific musical phrase with what I consider to be the correct note even if it’s not the one commonly played (that’s pretty vague but barring my filming a video of myself singing the difference, you’re just gonna have to go with that explanation). Anyway, I never found that perfect version, but of the ones I did find one rose to the top as my favorite. While in this rabbit hole of song versions, I came across a lot of very…let’s just say, interesting, ones. The 70s and 80s produced some interesting video productions of Lift Every Voice and Sing. Some of them were just fun re-interpretations, and …

Cambridge Riots in the 60s

fyeahblackhistory:   The Cambridge Race Riots of the 1960’s “The Past: Our cradle, not our prison; there is danger as well as appeal in its glamour. The past is for inspiration, not imitation, for continuation, not repetition.”   From Wikipedia: The Cambridge Riots of 1963, were race riots that occurred during the summer of 1963 in Cambridge, Maryland, a small town on the Eastern Shore.[1] The riots emerged during the Civil Rights Movement, led by Gloria Richardson and the local chapter of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, and its opposition by pro-segregationist civilians and police. … Gloria Richardson, a graduate from Howard University helped establish organizations that addressed community concerns about civil rights. Richardson also was a key leader in promoting black pride. [4] Governor Tawes declares martial law and deploys the Maryland National Guard to Cambridge after the CNAC refuses a year-long moratorium on protests. The guardsmen remain in the town for a 25-day period, from June 14 through July 8.[3] On July 11 a clash between white and African-American civilians breaks out when six sit-in demonstrators at Dizzyland restaurant, one of the main targets of the CNACs summer-long …