Book 18: Eloquent Rage, A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower–Brittney Cooper

What I loved about reading this book is that she spoke so directly to so many of my life experiences, particularly when it comes to Black exceptionalism, overachieving, and adherence to respectability. While we decidedly had very different economic upbringings, it was like we experienced the same social frustrations and racial animosity of instructors and…

Read More

Who Do You Think You Are?: Searching For My Ancestors

I recently posted about my experiences at the Melrose Plantation from back in June, and then last week I visited the Whitney Plantation, which is the only one I really wanted to visit, and which I’ll write more about later. I’m living in a state full of former plantations in a region of the country…

Read More

Stand Your Ground. Can We Stop Lying to Ourselves?

Anonymous 1 it’s really very simple, if you don’t want to get shot – don’t start violence. If someone is rude to you because you are in a handicapped spot, its not ok to shove them. He escalated that confrontation to physical violence and that’s the repercussion. Is it unfortunate? absolutely – that whole situation…

Read More

Questioning Affirmative Action

Racial justice advocates should consider, with a degree of candor that has not yet been evident, whether affirmative action–as it has been framed and defended during the past thirty years–has functioned more like a racial bribe than a tool of racial justice. One might wonder, what does affirmative action have to do with mass incarceration?…

Read More

The Impact of Police Violence is Far Reaching and Long Lasting

Last week I, as many others, looked for every update that could be found about Erica Garner. Horrified at the possibility of police violence claiming yet another victim. Hopeful that she would pull through. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case. At 27, a woman who had to watch her father get choked to death on TV…

Read More

Book 3: The Coldest Winter Ever–Sister Souljah

I know that I’m super late, but if anybody happens to be later than me, this is a must read! I read this book like I (used to) binge TV series on Netflix, and it’s about 400 pages long. But it reads like you’re watching episodes of TV. It’s Power before Power existed, from a…

Read More

Book 1: Shifting: The Double Lives of Black Women in America–Charisse Jones & Kumea Shorter-Gooden, PhD

Excerpt: Much of the shifting that Black women do is motivated by a wish, sometimes conscious, sometimes not, to confront, transcend, and hopefully defeat the ugly myths and stereotypes that so many in society continue to hold about them. Many women have developed ways of acting, talking, and dressing that conform to White middle-class norms…

Read More

The relevance of reading, or why this shouldn’t come as a surprise

In light of the trending “Alternative Facts” presented by the Trump kool-aid drinkers, and the accompanying societal disbelief expressed on social media, I thought this paragraph I was reading for my own studies was particularly relevant: …when people define situations as real, they are real. We shall try to remember throughout our inquiry that material facts…

Read More