Month: February 2018

Audre Lorde on Race Consciousness

But we never ever talked about what it meant and felt like to be Black and white, and the effects that had on our being friends. Of course, everybody with any sense deplored racial discrimination, theoretically and without discussion. We could conquer it by ignoring it. … How meager the sustenance was I gained from the four years I spent in high school; yet, how important that sustenance was to my survival. Remembering that time is like watching old pictures of myself in a prison camp picking edible scraps out of the garbage heap, and knowing that without that garbage I might have starved to death. The overwhelming racism of so many of the faculty, including the ones upon whom I had my worst schoolgirl crushes. How little I settled for int he way of human contact, compared to what I was conscious of wanting. It was in high school that I came to believe that I was different from my white classmates, not because I was Black, but because I was me. -Audre Lorde, …

All on a Mardi Gras Day…while sober

I was sober this Mardi gras as part of my year-long commitment to sobriety. Everyone was very concerned for me about how it would be without alcohol; how difficult it would be to just drink water (I don’t drink soda) while everyone else was in their own giggling, tipsy world. But it really wasn’t a big deal. I was armed with some cans of Lacroix for Nyx and Muses, had some fancy french soda during Orpheuscapade, and drank coffee and kombucha while I watched Zulu and wandered the quarter in the afternoon (I know, the kombucha sounds pretty crunchy-granola, but I think it’s a good beer substitute). While some of the magic, experienced through rose colored glasses (i.e., drunk goggles), was lost, most of it was still there. And it was the most alert and energetic Mardi Gras (MG) day I’ve had to date. If you’ve never been in New Orleans during Mardi gras (MG) season (yes, it’s a season, starting on Epiphany/January 6th until whenever Mardi gras lands on the day before Ash Wednesday), …

Book 7: Zami: A New Spelling of My Name–Audre Lorde

Admission: I added Audre Lorde to my list of Black women authors to read because I thought I should stop silently nodding my head in agreement whenever someone referenced her during conversation so I could avoid having to admit that I’d actually never read any of her work, and finally be able to critically engage in those discussions. There are certain authors that are required reading when you go to a school like Oberlin, and you sound like a fool when you don’t know them. Lorde is one of them. I wasn’t sure what I was going to get reading Zami. I chose this book rather than her other works because I remember getting emails from/about the student organization of the same name while at Oberlin. An organization that was for LGBTQ+ students of color that engaged in political activism and published a magazine (Zami Zine). I won’t say I breezed through this book like I have the previous few I’ve read on my 30 to 30 list, but I did finish feeling like I’d …